Truman Bethurum and the Origin of the Demonic Theory of UFO – Part 1

I’ve been researching the roots of Christian Ufology lately. I’ve already written on initial Christian reactions to the advent of the flying saucer phenomenon and how the idea that UFOs were Biblically foretold harbingers of God’s judgment was further developed by charismatic and Pentecostal preachers affiliated with the Voice of Healing magazine. Ironically, it was…

Kenneth Arnold and the Cryptozoological Theory of UFO

Believe it or not, one if the theories proposed to explain the UFO phenomenon is that they are as yet undiscovered biological entities.  That’s right. Critters in the sky! What’s more, the earliest well-known proponent of the Cryptozoological Theory of UFO, as it’s called, was none other than Kenneth Arnold, the fellow whose June 24,…

Sci-fi Televangelism – Part 5: Alien Christology

We have been reviewing a presentation called “Science Fiction: Televangelism for ET Religion” given by fellow science fiction author Dr. Michael Heiser gave  at the 2017 Roswell UFO Festival. Basically, Heiser has set out to demonstrate that sci-fi is isn’t just escapism entertainment but is “deeply theological.” So far, we’ve covered four of his proposed…

How To Stop An Alien Abduction

Ann Druffel wrote a book called How To Defend Yourself Against Alien Abduction. Ann Druffel’s book draws from 120 research cases. Like me, Druffel thinks that the experiencer phenomenon should be evaluated separately from the rest of the UFO phenomenon. According to her website, she believes the gollowing regarding the abduction phenomenon: “Since most abduction scenarios…

John Weldon and Zola Levitt Take On ‘The Bible and Life in Outer Space’

John Weldon and Zola Levitt are best known as the authors of UFOs: What on Earth is Happening? The 1975 book was influential in popularizing the Demonic Eschatological Hypothesis of UFO, especially because it received encouraging back cover blurbs from Hal Lindsey (author of The Late, Great Planet Earth (1970)) and Walter R Martin (aka…

New Survey Says That Almost Half of All Americans Believe in Aliens

In the mid-July 2017, 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment commissioned a national survey conducted by Toluna regarding UFOs, aliens and abductions. The purpose of the survey was to celebrate and promote the August 1, 2017 release of its film, Phoenix Forgotten. 1,756 Americans participated in the survey. Their ages ranged from 18 to 55 and…

Where Do Aliens Come From?

We used to believe that intelligent alien life might be found within our very Solar system, perhaps even on the Moon itself; however, as we continue to explore the cosmos, the Extraterrestrial Hypothesis has undergone a steady territorial retreat. The Great Moon Hoax of 1835 was disproven by further telescopic surveys.  Mars and Venus were…

Sci-fi Televangelism – Part 4: Alien Salvation & Transhumanism 

We have been reviewing a presentation called “Science Fiction: Televangelism for ET Religion” given by fellow science fiction author Dr. Michael Heiser gave  at the 2017 Roswell UFO Festival. Basically, Heiser has set out to demonstrate that sci-fi is isn’t just escapism entertainment but is “deeply theological.” So far, we’ve covered three of his proposed…

The First Abductee: A Humorist’s Fiction?

In researching the origins of the UFO phenomenon, especially the advent of the Flying Saucer Craze, one is continually surprised by what one discovers.  While looking up material on the origins of Rev. Orval Lee Jaggers’ belief that flying saucers were kidnapping human beings, I ran across a humorist column that gave a tongue-in-cheek contactee tale…

Early Christian Views on Flying Saucers: The Early 1950s & Voice of Healing 

In the early 1950s, Christians were still trying to make sense of the flying saucer phenomenon.  Men associated with the Pentecostal Voice of Healing magazine were among the first on record to weigh in. Gordon Lindsay In July 1950, Gordon Lindsay wrote an article for Voice of Healing called “Prophetic Significance of The Flying Saucer”…

Why the Term “Flying Saucers” Wasn’t “An Historic Misquote”

I think it’s high time we shot one enduringly false UFO meme down. I’m pretty sure most people have heard the standard tale of how the term flying saucers came to be. On June 25, 1947, The East Oregonian ran a brief story by Bill Bequette with the heafline “Impossible! Maybe, But Seein’ Is Believin’,…